Keynote Speakers

 

Susan O'Malley
Former president, Washington Sports and Entertainment
Sunday, Aug. 10, Noon

 

David Gergen
Co-director, Center for Public Leadership
Monday, Aug. 11, Noon

 

Nicholas Burns
Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Politics
Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Wednesday, Aug. 13, Noon

 


 

 

SOMalley

Susan O'Malley
Former president, Washington Sports & Entertainment
Sunday, Aug. 10, Noon

As the first female president of a professional sports franchise, O’Malley is a pioneer in two fields: sports and business. She knows what it takes to be a leader in a tough business environment and how to create an organization from the ground up. Once an intern with the Washington Capitals and the Washington Bullets (now the Wizards), O’Malley joined Washington Sports and Entertainment in 1986. Her ground-breaking business ideas and proactive approach to customer service brought her–and WSE–to the top of the sports business world.
After leaving Washington Sports and Entertainment, O’Malley earned a law degree from Georgetown University, where she also taught a sports business marketing class and was awarded the Adjunct Professor of the Year Award. She served as St. Joseph’s University’s first sports marketing professor and currently is teaching sports marketing and sports law at the College of Charleston. She also is consulting with The Sports and Entertainment Company.

 


Gergen

David Gergen
Co-director, Center for Public Leadership
Monday, Aug. 11, Noon

David Gergen is the co-director of the Center for Public Leadership and a senior political analyst for CNN, and has served as an adviser to four U.S. presidents of both parties. He is a professor of public service at the Harvard Kennedy School and the director of its Center for Public Leadership. In 2000, he published the best-selling book, Eyewitness to Power: The Essence of Leadership, Nixon to Clinton.
Gergen joined the Nixon White House in 1971, as a staff assistant on the speech writing team, a group of heavyweights that included Pat Buchanan, Ben Stein and Bill Safire. Gergen went on to work in the administration of Gerald Ford and as an adviser to the 1980 George H.W. Bush presidential campaign. He served as director of communications for Ronald Reagan and as adviser to Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Warren Christopher on domestic and foreign affairs.
In the 1980s, he began a career in journalism. Starting with The McNeil-Lehrer NewsHour in 1984, he has been a regular commentator on public affairs for more than 28 years. He has twice been a member of election coverage teams that won Peabody awards. In the late 1980s, he was chief editor of U.S. News & World Report, working with publisher Mort Zuckerman to achieve record gains in circulation and advertising. Today, he appears frequently on CNN as senior political analyst.
Gergen joined the Harvard faculty in 1999, and his work as director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Kennedy School has enabled him to work closely with a rising generation of younger leaders, especially social entrepreneurs, military veterans and Young Global Leaders chosen by the World Economic Forum.

 

 


Nicholas BurnsBurns
Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Politics
Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Wednesday, Aug. 13, Noon

Nicholas Burns is professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He is director of the Future of Diplomacy Project and faculty chair for the Programs on the Middle East and on India and South Asia. He serves on the Board of Directors of the School’s Belfer Center for Science and International
Affairs and is a faculty associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.

He is director of the Aspen Strategy Group, senior counselor at the Cohen Group and serves on the Board of Directors of Entegris, Inc. He writes a biweekly column on foreign affairs for The Boston Globe.

Burns serves on the boards of several non-profit organizations, including the Council on Foreign Relations, Special Olympics, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress, the Richard
Lounsbery Foundation, the Atlantic Council, American Media Abroad, the Association of Diplomatic Studies and Training, the Appeal of Conscience Foundation and the Gennadius Library. He is vice chairman of the American Ditchley Foundation and serves on the Panel of Senior Advisors at Chatham House: the Royal Institute of International Affairs. He is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Trilateral Commission, the Order of Saint John and Red Sox Nation.

Burns served in the United States government for twenty-seven years. As a career Foreign Service Officer, he was Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs from 2005 to 2008; the State Department’s third-ranking official when he led
negotiations on the U.S.–India Civil Nuclear Agreement; a long-term military assistance agreement with Israel and was the lead U.S. negotiator on Iran’s nuclear program. He was U.S. Ambassador to NATO (2001–2005), Ambassador to Greece (1997–2001) and State Department Spokesman (1995–1997). He worked for five years (1990–1995) on the National Security Council at the White House where he was senior director for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia Affairs and Special Assistant to President Clinton and Director for Soviet Affairs in the Administration of President George H.W. Bush. Burns also served in the American Consulate General in Jerusalem (1985–1987) where he coordinated U.S. economic assistance to the Palestinian people in the West Bank and before that, at the American embassies in Egypt (1983-1985) and Mauritania (1980 as an intern).

Burns has received twelve honorary degrees, the Secretary of State’s Distinguished Service Award, the Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service from the Johns Hopkins University and the Boston College Alumni Achievement Award. He has a BA in History from Boston College (1978), an MA in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (1980), and earned the Certificat Pratique de Langue Francaise at the University of Paris-Sorbonne (1977). He was a visiting Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in summer 2008.