3.2 Research Space & Efficiency
Another important input for research is space. This report uses data from the National Science Foundation’s 2011 Survey of Science and Engineering Research Facilities to calculate how many net assignable square feet of research space is available across different states. Dividing a state’s research output by its net assignable square feet produces another measure of how efficient that state is in terms of producing research.22
Across the U.S., academic institutions produced on average 0.8 publications per 1,000 net assignable square feet.
Rhode Island was the top-ranked state; in 2011, its academic institutions produced 4.7 publications per 1,000 net assignable square feet.
Massachusetts and Vermont were second and third, with 4.6 and 4.0 publications, respectively. When this analysis is restricted to just medical publications from academic institutions per 1,000 net assignable square feet of medical school research space,23 Massachusetts and Rhode Island led all states with 9.9 and 7.4 publications, respectively.
Figure 3.3 plots publications from academic institutions versus net assignable square feet; states with high levels of publications per 1,000 net assignable square feet are highlighted.

Figure 3.3— Publications from Academic Institutions versus Net Assignable Square Feet for Research across all States, 2011. Source: Scopus® and NSF Survey of Science and Engineering Research Facilities. For ease of viewing, the x- and y-axes are expressed in logarithmic instead of linear terms.

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