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CSG COMMUNITY

Rep. Rick Youngblood

Idaho

“When I ran and got elected, I didn’t come with any agendas. My goal was to do the work of the state. Get budgets done, get them done timely and with a lot of thought,” he said.  

A banker by trade, Idaho Rep. Rick Youngblood has worked hard over the years to keep the state budget in order.  

“Idaho is required to have a balanced budget. My biggest priority is to make sure Idaho has a balanced budget,” Youngblood said.   

Youngblood is a co-chairman of the Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for setting the budgets for each state agency. He has served on the committee since elected to office in 2013.  

He said his goal while in office has always been simple — to get the budget done. 

“When I ran and got elected, I didn’t come with any agendas. My goal was to do the work of the state. Get budgets done, get them done timely and with a lot of thought,” he said.  

Youngblood became a representative because he wanted to give back to the place that provided him so much.  

“I am an Idaho native, born in Boise. I wanted to give back to my home state,” he said. “I wanted to come discover what the work was and to do the work. That is what I continue to do. I try to stay out of the politics as much as I can, but it is a political position.” 

He also serves on the Transportation Committee where he is able to provide some expertise due to his background as a highway commissioner.  

Youngblood has many proud moments in office, but he points to a particular bill he carried as one of his finest moments.  

“I carried a personal bill for four years that I didn’t bring to the floor. I wanted the words ‘In God we Trust,’ [posted in the House]. In 2019, I brought it out. It passed overwhelmingly. I paid for the letters to be on the House side. The words are now permanently placed in the House behind the speaker and in the Senate behind the president pro tempore,” he said.  

It was experiences like that that only further illustrate to the representative that sometimes work takes time to achieve. However, while in office, he has come to realize that sometimes this is hard for his constituents to understand, and they can become impatient.  

“(I want) constituents to really understand that corrective, long term beneficial change does not happen overnight. It might take a year or two or three to get that through.” 

But Youngblood is committed to serving his constituents, and he has tried to follow the best advice he was given in office and in his personal life.  

“The best advice I ever received I learned years ago, I read Robert Greenleaf. I studied Servant leadership, which is making sure other people’s highest priorities are being served first,” he said. “I’ve always worked hard and prided myself on thinking of others prior to myself.”